An installation created for Artomatic 2017 in Crystal City, VA.  On view from March 24th-May 6th 2017.

Naive Melody This installation is an exploration of my proclivities and artistic habits. The gestures, colors, and shapes that continually show up in my work whether I will it or not, the obsessive repeating of patterns and objects, the doubt and joy that comingle in the act of creation. I chose to situate the space like a bedroom to heighten the sense of intimacy between the works and the viewer. The set up meant to peel back the curtain to the idea of artworks as finished products and show them more as individual notes to a larger song that I'm learning how to play. My work often stems from simple gestures or shapes that are then repeated or layered over and over to create a larger impact. I aspire to a clean, minimalism in my work, but most of the time get too excited by my materials and wind up with an explosion of color and shape. This tension between control and chaos is one that I am endlessly fascinated by, and driven to explore.

Naive Melody

This installation is an exploration of my proclivities and artistic habits. The gestures, colors, and shapes that continually show up in my work whether I will it or not, the obsessive repeating of patterns and objects, the doubt and joy that comingle in the act of creation.

I chose to situate the space like a bedroom to heighten the sense of intimacy between the works and the viewer. The set up meant to peel back the curtain to the idea of artworks as finished products and show them more as individual notes to a larger song that I'm learning how to play.

My work often stems from simple gestures or shapes that are then repeated or layered over and over to create a larger impact. I aspire to a clean, minimalism in my work, but most of the time get too excited by my materials and wind up with an explosion of color and shape. This tension between control and chaos is one that I am endlessly fascinated by, and driven to explore.

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Rejects Personal retrospective through perceived failure Works on paper 2009-2017 I am primarily a sculptor, who works in large scale outdoor and indoor installations. But I find myself making a lot of drawings, prints, and paintings on paper even though I consider my proficiency in these mediums to be rudimentary. Many times I am just doodling or experimenting. Sometimes I'm trying to achieve a vision and falling short. Some are studies for sculpture projects, while others act as a visual diary. The majority of these works sit in plastic bins after being made, in a sort of exiled limbo. Sometimes a work will get cut up and reconfigured into a new 2D piece, as is the case with works in my Fragments Series. None of these pieces were made to be exhibited. Many are slightly embarrassing to me. But viewed together, overlapping and supporting one another, they begin to speak to a cohesive vision that I'm always searching for. By displaying these personal studies, sketches, and failures, I attempt to find threads and themes in an inadvertent body of work I have been unconsciously creating for years.  Despite feeling like a novice, I can't deny that painting plays a role in the development of my sculptures. I'm very interested in this connection, even if I don't understand it fully.  I've often found that painting acts as sort of a bridge between my understanding of 2D and 3D space. So finally, after being stacked and piled and forgotten in the corners of my studio, these works get their day in the sun.

Rejects

Personal retrospective through perceived failure

Works on paper 2009-2017


I am primarily a sculptor, who works in large scale outdoor and indoor installations. But I find myself making a lot of drawings, prints, and paintings on paper even though I consider my proficiency in these mediums to be rudimentary. Many times I am just doodling or experimenting. Sometimes I'm trying to achieve a vision and falling short. Some are studies for sculpture projects, while others act as a visual diary.

The majority of these works sit in plastic bins after being made, in a sort of exiled limbo. Sometimes a work will get cut up and reconfigured into a new 2D piece, as is the case with works in my Fragments Series.

None of these pieces were made to be exhibited. Many are slightly embarrassing to me. But viewed together, overlapping and supporting one another, they begin to speak to a cohesive vision that I'm always searching for. By displaying these personal studies, sketches, and failures, I attempt to find threads and themes in an inadvertent body of work I have been unconsciously creating for years. 

Despite feeling like a novice, I can't deny that painting plays a role in the development of my sculptures. I'm very interested in this connection, even if I don't understand it fully.  I've often found that painting acts as sort of a bridge between my understanding of 2D and 3D space.

So finally, after being stacked and piled and forgotten in the corners of my studio, these works get their day in the sun.